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  1. Exportação Café Ecologico–Inglaterra

    This was the title of the email I received last week. Simple translation/meaning - the export of eco/organic/biodiverse coffee to England. 
    Just had confirmation from Athos at the Gerezim Farm in Brazil that our coffee is packed and ready to ship - as many of you know this is one of our direct trade relationships and their coffee is outstanding. 
    Check out the bags getting packed

    brazil2011 packed_01  brazil2011 packed_02  brazil2011 packed_03  brazil2011 packed_04  brazil2011 packed_05

  2. ‘Ethical Objections to Fairtrade’ by Peter Griffiths has just been published in the Journal of Business Ethics 

    http://www.griffithsspeaker.com/Fairtrade/why_fair_trade_isn.htm 

    It quotes a wide range of academic field research and information provided by Fairtrade itself. Its conclusions are:

    The Fairtrade movement is a group of businesses claiming to trade ethically. The claims are evaluated, under a range of criteria derived from the Utilitarian ethic. Firstly, if aid or charity money is diverted from the very poorest people to the quite poor, or the rich, there is an increase in death and destitution. It is shown that little of the extra paid by consumers for Fairtrade reaches farmers, sometimes none. It cannot be shown that it has a positive impact on Fairtrade farmers in general, but evidence suggesting it harms others is presented. Many of the weaknesses are due to an attempt to impose political views on farmers and others.

    Secondly, the unfair trading criteria require that sellers do not lie about their product, nor withhold information that might alter the decisions of a substantial proportion of buyers. It is argued that the system only can exist because of the failure of the Fairtrade industry to give the facts on what happens to the money and what it can be proved it achieves. This unfair trading compromises the reputation of charities in general.

    Much of the trading may constitute the criminal offence of Unfair Trading in the EU.

    Peter Griffiths says: "I have worked on food and agricultural marketing in 30 countries around the world, for governments, the EC, the World Bank, UNDP, FAO etc. Few people would claim my knowledge or experience of this subject, which is where Fairtrade operates."

  3. unfair trade
    Book published exploring "How big business exploits the world's poor - and why it doesn't have to"

    CLICK to buy on Amazon

    How is it that our favourite brands can import billions of pounds’ worth of goods from the developing world every year, and yet leave the people who produce them barely scraping a living? Is it that big business is incompatible with the eradication of poverty? And, if so, are charity and fair trade initiatives the only way forward?

    In Unfair Trade Conor Woodman traces a range of products back to their source to uncover who precisely is benefitting and who is losing out. He goes diving with lobster fishermen in Nicaragua who are dying in their hundreds to keep the restaurant tables of the US well stocked. He ventures into war-torn Congo to find out what the developed world’s insatiable demand for tin means for local miners. And he risks falling foul of the authorities in Laos as he covertly visits the country’s burgeoning rubber plantations, established to supply Chinese factories that in turn supply the West with consumer goods. In the process, he tests accepted economic wisdom on the best way to create a fairer world – and suggests a simpler but potentially far more radical solution.

    From the Back Cover

    'Conor Woodman takes the dismal out of the dismal science. He's written an alternative travel guide to the global economy.' Liam Halligan, Sunday Telegraph

    How is it that our favourite brands can import billions of pounds’ worth of goods from the developing world every year, and yet leave the people who produce them barely scraping a living? Is it that big business is incompatible with the eradication of poverty? And, if so, are charity and fair trade initiatives the only way forward?

    In Unfair Trade Conor Woodman traces a range of products back to their source to uncover who precisely is benefitting and who is losing out. He goes diving with lobster fishermen in Nicaragua who are dying in their hundreds to keep the restaurant tables of the US well stocked. He ventures into war-torn Congo to find out what the developed world’s insatiable demand for tin means for local miners. And he risks falling foul of the authorities in Laos as he covertly visits the country’s burgeoning rubber plantations, established to supply Chinese factories that in turn supply the West with consumer goods. In the process, he tests accepted economic wisdom on the best way to create a fairer world – and suggests a simpler but potentially far more radical solution.